Storytelling about climate change at the «Klimagarten 2085»
publiziert: Mittwoch, 27. Apr 2016 / 14:40 Uhr

Climate change has been communicated as a global concern affecting all of mankind; but this message doesn't seem to be getting through. If indeed the human brain responds better to experience than to analysis, then climate change must be told as a local and personal story - just as the Klimagarten 2085 exhibition is doing.

A study on public understanding of an IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) graph caught my interest recently. Interviews were conducted with forty politicians, communication experts and academics, and three climate scientists. The results showed that the lay respondents were confused by the meaning of the graph and the term «uncertainty»; only the climate scientists understood it correctly (for more information see).

Simplicity beats complexity

This confusion about what is uncertain and what not determines how narratives are framed in public discourse. Richard Matthew investigates universal versus particular narratives. He asserts that a simple, but intense universal story, such as genocide or torture, can make an impact on a particular community even if they are not directly affected by it.

The dominant climate change narrative, however, tells a highly complex universal story - which is the narrative form least likely to succeed. While the human factor in climate change is certain, the extent of its effect and impact across the planet is uncertain. So although the climate change story should be universal and intense, prompting moral outrage and action, it is instead complex and contested, and finds no place in local dialogue.

Best practice insights from psychology

So what type of message will inform better dialogue and effect behavioural change? Climate scientists and communication projects such as the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication advise policymakers to turn to psychology for insights. A recently published paper advocates five best practices: 

- emphasize climate change as a present, local, and personal risk;
- facilitate more affective and experiential engagement;
- leverage relevant social group norms;
- frame policy solutions in terms of what can be gained from immediate action;
- and appeal to intrinsically valued long-term environmental goals and outcomes

Two ways of processing

Climate issues are often presented in a format which assumes that lay people process uncertain information in a logical, analytical manner. Yet psychologists have shown that the human brain uses two different processing systems. The first is intuitive, experiential, emotional and fast. The second is deliberative, analytical, rational and slow. We constantly make judgments using these systems in parallel, but when they diverge the first system dominates. In other words, how we feel about something has a stronger influence on how we respond. Therefore, to be effective, information about climate change risks must be translated into 'relatable and concrete personal experiences'. 

Perceiving change in a garden

We therefore decided to invite the public to personally experience future climate scenarios and their effect on agricultural plants and our landscape and forests. In collaboration with the Botanical Garden of the University of Zurich, the Zurich-Basel Plant Science Center is initiating a public art-science experiment, Klimagarten 2085, which offers an opportunity for social learning and shows the impact of climate change at a human and local level.

Two climate scenarios will be created in greenhouses in the Old Botanical Garden in Zurich, at temperatures of +2 and +4°C above the current annual summer temperatures. Plants that flourish in northern Switzerland will be grown both in the greenhouses and outside, to enable comparisons between what we currently grow and eat, and what may happen in the future. Visitors can participate by taking measurements of drought and heat-stressed plants. Accompanying the installation is a program of workshops for families and school groups, art performances, and talks by botanists, ecologists, plant scientists and geographers from ETH Zurich and the Universities of Zurich and Basel.

We hope by telling a local story about the future climate of Zurich, the Klimagarten will engage and inspire people to think differently about global (and local) warming.

( Juanita Schlaepfer-Miller/ETH-Zukunftsblog)

?
Facebook
SMS
SMS
0
Forum
.
Digitaler Strukturwandel  Nach über 16 Jahren hat sich news.ch entschlossen, den Titel in seiner jetzigen Form einzustellen. Damit endet eine Ära medialer Pionierarbeit. mehr lesen 21
Mit Biogas betriebene Wärme-Kraft-Kopplungsanlagen (WKK) können fluktuierenden Solarstrom kompensieren und Gebäude beheizen.
Mit Biogas betriebene ...
Eine zentrale Herausforderung der Energiewende ist es, die schwankende Stromproduktion aus erneuerbaren Quellen auszugleichen. Eine Machbarkeitsstudie zeigt nun für drei Schweizer Kantone auf, wie ein Verbund von Wärme-Kraft-Kopplungsanlagen kurzfristige Engpässe überbrücken und Gebäude mit Strom und Wärme versorgen kann. mehr lesen 
Vor rund hundert Jahren begann die Industrialisierung der Landwirtschaft - heute erleben wir den Beginn ihrer Digitalisierung. Damit die Big-Data-Welle den Bauer nicht vom Acker schwemmt, sondern ihn optimal unterstützt, gilt es, das Feld früh zu bestellen und Marken zu setzen, damit die digitale Landwirtschaft die richtigen Fragen adressiert. mehr lesen  
Die Schweizer Wasserkraft darbt. Die Ursache dafür sind letztlich Verzerrungen im europäischen Strommarkt. Nun diskutiert die Politik Subventionen für die Grosswasserkraft. Allfällige Rettungsaktionen sollten berücksichtigen, dass die Wasserkraftwerke noch Sparpotenzial bei den Kosten aufweisen. mehr lesen  
Climate change has been communicated as a global concern affecting all of mankind; but this message doesn't seem to be getting through. If indeed the human brain responds better to experience than to analysis, then climate change must be told as a local and personal story - just as the Klimagarten 2085 exhibition is doing. mehr lesen  

Fakten und Meinungen zu Nachhaltigkeit

Der Zukunftsblog der ETH Zürich nimmt aktuelle Themen der Nachhaltigkeit auf. Er bietet eine Informations- und Meinungsplattform, auf der sich Expertinnen und Experten der ETH zu den Themenschwerpunkten Klimawandel, Energie, Zukunftsstädte, Welternährung und Natürliche Ressourcen äussern. Prominente Gäste aus Forschung, Politik und Gesellschaft tragen mit eigenen Beiträgen zur Diskussion bei.

Lesen Sie weitere Beiträge und diskutieren Sie mit auf: www.ethz.ch/zukunftsblog

.
Green Investment news.ch geht in Klausur Nach über 16 Jahren hat sich news.ch entschlossen, den Titel in ... 21
 
Stellenmarkt.ch
Kreditrechner
Wunschkredit in CHF
wetter.ch
Heute Sa So
Zürich 2°C 6°C starker Schneeregenleicht bewölkt, ueberwiegend sonnig bewölkt, etwas Schnee Wolkenfelder, Flocken
Basel 4°C 7°C Schneeregenschauerleicht bewölkt, ueberwiegend sonnig Wolkenfelder, Flocken wechselnd bewölkt
St. Gallen 1°C 4°C Schneeschauerleicht bewölkt, ueberwiegend sonnig bedeckt, etwas Schnee bewölkt, etwas Schnee
Bern 3°C 5°C Schneeregenschauerleicht bewölkt, ueberwiegend sonnig Wolkenfelder, Flocken freundlich
Luzern 4°C 5°C starker Schneeregenleicht bewölkt, ueberwiegend sonnig bedeckt, etwas Schnee bewölkt, etwas Schnee
Genf 3°C 7°C Schneeregenleicht bewölkt, ueberwiegend sonnig bewölkt, etwas Schnee freundlich
Lugano 4°C 8°C freundlichleicht bewölkt, ueberwiegend sonnig recht sonnig sonnig
mehr Wetter von über 8 Millionen Orten
 
 
Der Remoteserver hat einen Fehler zurückgegeben: (500) Interner Serverfehler.
Source: http://www.news.ch/ajax/seminar.aspx?ID=858&lang=de